Miyerkules, Mayo 8, 2019

Museo de Intramuros an exhibit presents the story of the evangelization of the Philippines!

"This collection of the Intramuros Administration is extremely valuable because it represents the first real attempt to collect and preserve within the Philippines an important aspect of the country's cultural heritage. The collection affords the viewer a panorama of the various styles and enables him to compare them with the artifacts done abroad in the same medium. We Filipinos have always tended to accept that we were the passive receiver of artistic stimuli from abroad. This collection proves that the Philippines was as much a giver." ~Dr. Esperanza Gatbonton, Curator of the book Philippine Religious Imaginary
Museo de Intramuros
The Catholic Church in the Philippines is part of the worldwide Catholic Church, under the spiritual direction of the Pope. The Philippines is one of the two nations in Asia having a substantial portion of the population professing the Catholic faith and has the third largest Catholic population in the world. Christianity was first brought to the Philippine islands by Spanish missionaries and colonists, in the early 16th century in Cebu.


Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros is an exhibit presents the story of the evangelization of the Philippines from the perspective of the Filipinos. Officially opened last April 29, 2019, and admission is free and is now open to the public.


Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museum de Intramuros is managed by the Intramuros Administration (IA). It explores the "Filipino" psyche as it is introduced to a new religion and culture. It aims to highlight the resulting Filipino artistry and craftsmanship in the merging of the indigenous and the foreign, in the form of religious images belonging to the Intramuros Administration collection.


What to expect and see inside the Museum de Intramuros:
  • Art collections
  • Religious images
  • Church Ornaments
  • Ecclesiastical art
  • Furniture
  • Vestments
  • Textiles
  • Artifacts

Museo de Intramuros

Museum de Intramuros 6 Components:

The Immaculate Conception
The Immaculate Conception is images from the Intramuros Administration Collection chronicle the local evolution of her iconography. Experimentations led carvers to self-assertion, drawing from their own culture and new-found faith to honor Manry.

Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros

The Religious Orders
Spain's overseas expansion had a two-fold purpose. The first objective, to gain more colonies for the Spanish Empire; the second was to "Christianize" the inhabitants, who were largely animists who believed that spirits inhabit their surroundings. Five religious orders played an important role in the evangelization of the archipelago. The Augustinians arrived in the Philippines in 1565, followed by the Franciscans arrived in 1587, the Jesuits in 1581, Dominican Order in 1587, and lastly the Recollects (Discalced Augustinians) in 1606.

Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
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Museo de Intramuros

Exhibit is curated by:
  • Dr. Esperanza Gatbonton
  • Gino Gonzales
  • Dr. Cecilia dela Paz
  • Santiago Pilar
  • Martin Tinio


The Patronato Real and the Establishment of Parishes
The Royal Certificate of Patronage in the Indies (Real Patronato Indiano) consolidated the colonial governance of the Philippines. By the time the Patronato Real was issued, the construction of churches, cathedrals, convents, hospitals, among others, all fell under royal authorization. Royal consent was needed because each new parish obliged the king to allocate funds from the Hacienda Real to provide the new parish priest with an annual stipend, as well as furnish each new parish church with the required sacred vessels. On the other hand, the citizens of every town were required to provide building materials and labor for the construct of their parish church and convent.

Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
"IA's dedication in ensuring that the tangible treasures that immortalize our history are now accessible to the public is commendable. This project, rooted in passion and a deep love of country, must be emulated and replicated. The Department of Tourism will be investing in the promotion of cultural tourism in the years to come. We're doing it not just because we need to expand our tourism products, engage a specific market and increase revenue. Cultural tourism is telling the world our narrative. It is also a frame to ensure that our heritage structures and objects such as these will be preserved and enjoyed by our progeny." ~Bernadette Romulo Puyat, DOT Secretary and Chairperson of the IA Board of Administrators

Religious Colonial Paintings
Amid the disappearance of the ancient script of baybayin, the indio's deprivation of Spanish, and the scarcity of books in the local languages, the Spanish missionaries converted the lowland natives to Christianity, especially aided by the images of admonition depicted in paintings and statues, vicarious experiences induced by dramas and rituals, and the consolation of songs. Painted representations may be classified as instructional, devotional or attendant. Te distinctive preferences of the Philippine colonial community in its choice of devotion to particular saints were influenced by the frequency of occurrences of specific vicissitudes of the causes of suffering, and the resulting terror from these conditions. 

Museo de Intramuros
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Museo de Intramuros

The Indio Response
The initial response of the Indio to evangelization was intimate, personal... their perception of godhood was tied to their own belief system of the anito (spirits) and their own native pantheon of gods, being dispensers of good and evil. The carvers were not schooled either, their productions described as clumsy, even ugly, yet compelling in a visceral sense. In the changing landscape of their own homeland, they felt the comfort of the new faith, because similar to the anitos, its saints could also intercede for them. With an emerging ilustrado class and mercantile economy, expressions of faith and develop to patron saints took on new meanings, slowly being equated, with wealth and status. It is in the realm of folk images, however, where the Filipino santeros achieved originality unleashing vibrant colors and florid designs and expressive imagery, as in this collection of urnas and relieves.

Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
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Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros

Las Casas de Dios The Establishment of a Parish and Sacred Vessels
Under the Patronato Real or Royal Patronage that was in effect from the first colonization efforts by Miguel Lopez de Lagazpi in 1571, and until the United States bought the colony from Spain in 1898, no parish or pueblo (town) could be established in the Philippines without the consent of the King. This was done either through a Decreto Real or Royal Decree or through a Decreto Superior, a decree signed by the Governor General upon orders of the King. At the onset, Intramuros was dotted with the provincial houses of religious orders. A provincial house had a church or chapel within its precincts, which had to be equipped with ecclesiastical silver pieces. As more churches were built by the orders, the need for silver ecclesiastical objects grew in the late sixteenth tot he nineteenth century.


Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
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Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros

The exhibition is able to highlight Filipino artistry and craftsmanship that was a result of the merging of the indigenous and the foreign, in the form of religious images belonging to the IA collection.

Museo de Intramuros
Museo de Intramuros
Upon viewing and seeing each piece at the museum it is proven that we Filipinos are such religious people, I highly recommend that each and every student from different universities that even if it doesn't interest them ITS A MUST VISIT MUSEUM because it will also take you to a journey where our folks embossed remarkable scarves that lead to having such religious museum at Museum de Intramuros.

Department of Tourism (DOT) invites the public either religious or museum enthusiasts to explore and learn about Philippine culture and history by visiting Museo de Intramuros in Manila City.

Museo de Intramuros

For more details and updates about Museo de Intramuros visit

Admission is FREE

Museo de Intramuros
Corner Arzobispo and Anda Streets, Intramuros, Manila (beside the Arzobispado de Manila)


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